Physical Space Tweets: Pst! microCONTROL

Pst! is the surreptitious beckoning of attention and the acronym for Physical Space Tweets. It is a small Ardunio storyteller installed in public space giving an audience a glimpse into a geo-tagged community’s topic feed.

For the Leeds Pavillion at Mediamatic’s Amsterdam Biennale 2009 Pst! chronicled life in Leeds through it’s twitter feed.

Pst! microCONTROL from Megan Leigh Smith on Vimeo.

The piece locates a public social narrative by pulling an information feed from Twitter User profiles geographically aligned to Leeds with Twitter’s geocode API and then prints this information onto a mini LCD screen. By removing the peripheral of the computer a Pst! device can be placed in a non-space providing a window directly into a geo-located public space.

See http://megansmith.ca/blog/?tag=arduino for more info.

Author Bio

Andy is Professor of Digital Urban Systems at the Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis at University College London.

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Greeble, MassFX and Lumion: Bouncing Balls in the City

As part of the MRes in Advanced Spatial Analysis and Visualisation, here in CASA, we are exploring various concepts relating to urban visualisation. These include both traditional urban based modelling approaches and more abstract visualisations and simulation techniques.

Currently we are exploring applications for physics engines in urban modelling, the first step of which is a series of techniques to introduce gravity and mass to urban models. We produced a tutorial back in 2009 using ‘Reactor’, Autodesk no longer use this engine and have now moved onto MassFX. MassFX adds a number of new options and tweaks to the simulation which took some time to work out. The concept however is the same, create a city using ‘Greeble’ and drop 200+ balls into the urban realm, using Lumion is it possible to view the simulation in realtime:

Music by Portoponte

Understanding MassFX is a first step towards mixing procedural cities, agent based modelling and physics simulations within a 3D urban environment, we will have more soon….

Author Bio

Andy is Professor of Digital Urban Systems at the Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis at University College London.

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Future Cities Workshop

Digitalurban is currently sitting at the bar at the Hilton O’Hare Chicago having just merged a panorama of the participants at the Future Cities Workshop. Lighting is always tricky in an enclosed room with panoramas, but if you get past the slight imperfections it shows the personnel that attended the workshop organised by the World University Network and Leeds University.

Tomorrow should provide some panoramas of downtown Chicago, including Millennium Park.

View the Quicktime panorama of the Future Cities Workshop at the Hilton Chicago O’Hare Airport (2.3mb).

Author Bio

Andy is Professor of Digital Urban Systems at the Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis at University College London.

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Digitalurban is currently sitting at the bar at the Hilton O’Hare Chicago having just merged a panorama of the participants at the Future Cities Workshop. Lighting is always tricky in an enclosed room with panoramas, but if you get past the slight imperfections it shows the personnel that attended the workshop organised by the World University Network and Leeds University.

Tomorrow should provide some panoramas of downtown Chicago, including Millennium Park.

View the Quicktime panorama of the Future Cities Workshop at the Hilton Chicago O’Hare Airport (2.3mb).

Author Bio

Andy is Professor of Digital Urban Systems at the Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis at University College London.

5 Comments

  1. Anonymous - September 3, 2006

    Hi there – I am really excited about seeing your work on game-engine based first-person Architectural exploration ……Maybe we could be of some help or at least correspond (our website http://www.archengine.org

    I, Pat Carmichael, or better we, HKS Architects, have been working with game engines since 1999…..

    my contact info: patrick@archengine.org

  2. Anonymous - September 3, 2006

    I’m very curious as to how you made this movie. I think it’s incredibly brilliant and it’s much better with the music. I would love to know how you made the camera move and what software you used. I have panorama stitching software, and even 3dvista software. How do you do the movement though? Please email me at justinbohannon@hotmail.com or post move how to’s here.

  3. Andy - September 4, 2006

    Patrick – thanks for the comment. I’ll def be in touch about ArchEngine… It would be good to include a write up on it here if your interested..

    Anon,

    Thanks also for the comments it was made in 3D Studio max, but any 3d software would do. You simply map panoramas to spheres and then move the camera around the 3D space.

    I’ll pop a tutorial up as soon as i can 🙂

  4. Anonymous - September 6, 2006

    A tutorial would be great to see for how to do this. I think I’ve managed to get the sphere in 3d studio max covered with the pano, but how do you do the camera, etc.

    Thanks in advance,
    Justin

    please msn or yahoo me
    justinbohannon@hotmail.com
    semohifi@yahoo.com

  5. Anonymous - March 26, 2007

    Hello! I watched the movie and I thought it was great! I was just wondering…what’s the background music? It’s so beautiful. If you can..please email me at

    explicitone@sbcglobal.net

    with the information. Thanks!

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The second in our series exploring high definition (1280×720) panoramas expands the concept to explore ‘worlds within worlds’. Embedding panoramas in a x/y/z space allows movies to be created where the camera automatically pans around a scene. Panoramas are traditionally interactive, thus all our output via this blog is available in Quicktime Virtual Reality. However, if you are going to display panoramas in a stand alone location, such as the front of an office or marketing suite, a movie is more suitable and thus the requirement to move panoramas into a 3D package.

If you expand this concept and embed panoramas within panoramas you can create ‘worlds within worlds’, as illustrated in the movie above. This allows a series of panoramas to be embedded within a ‘holding’ scene and presents a looping movie suitable for large displays.

The YouTube movie is for rapid visualisation only, the High Definition version can be downloaded here (94Mb High Definition wmv format).

Author Bio

Andy is Professor of Digital Urban Systems at the Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis at University College London.

9 Comments

  1. Dawid - November 2, 2007

    Most of those companies are next door neighbours, interesting isn’t it ?

  2. Andy - November 2, 2007

    This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

  3. Andy - November 2, 2007

    It is – it a) makes me want to move to The Bay Area and b) makes me wonder why the rest of the world is so behind that small geographic region….

  4. Geoff - November 2, 2007

    Andy,
    You’ll find some answers to your question in the work of internet geographer Matthew Zook. A good chunk of his work examines the clustering of internet firms, such as those Web 2.0 firms mapped here.

  5. Anonymous - November 2, 2007

    After i saw this I wondered what the dispersion looked like for software companies and arrived at this:
    http://virtualearth.spaces.live.com/blog/cns!2BBC66E99FDCDB98!9806.entry

    no huge surprises, but a lot more spread. 9 of the top 25 are outside of the bay area in this case.

    regards
    Steve Lombardi

  6. tyke - November 2, 2007

    Frisco.
    It’s a great city.
    There’s a saying there when people in frisco started getting jobs all the hippies moved to Oregon.
    🙂

  7. Anonymous - November 4, 2007

    Isn’t StumbleUpon from Calgary? As far as I remember, Calgary is in Canada, not the US.

  8. Anonymous - June 20, 2008

    Don’t know how you found the address for Facebook which you listed as:

    200 Paul Ave
    San Francisco, CA 94124, USA
    (415) 467-2300

    Now, if they didn’t move (very recently) the official Facebook HQ address is:

    156 University Avenue
    Suite 300
    Palo Alto, CA 94301

    -Michael

  9. pulmonary disease - June 26, 2010

    Hello san francisco got a lot of important companys so that is why the wow i can see tall the companys in the picture all in one place .

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