Physical Space Tweets: Pst! microCONTROL

Pst! is the surreptitious beckoning of attention and the acronym for Physical Space Tweets. It is a small Ardunio storyteller installed in public space giving an audience a glimpse into a geo-tagged community’s topic feed.

For the Leeds Pavillion at Mediamatic’s Amsterdam Biennale 2009 Pst! chronicled life in Leeds through it’s twitter feed.

Pst! microCONTROL from Megan Leigh Smith on Vimeo.

The piece locates a public social narrative by pulling an information feed from Twitter User profiles geographically aligned to Leeds with Twitter’s geocode API and then prints this information onto a mini LCD screen. By removing the peripheral of the computer a Pst! device can be placed in a non-space providing a window directly into a geo-located public space.

See http://megansmith.ca/blog/?tag=arduino for more info.

Author Bio

Andy is Professor of Digital Urban Systems at the Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis at University College London.

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William J. Mitchell: A sad loss of one of the best

MIT News has reported that William J. Mitchell, the former dean of MIT’s School of Architecture and Planning, who pioneered urban designs for networked, “smart” cities and helped oversee an ambitious building program that transformed MIT’s physical campus, died on June 11 after a long battle with cancer. He was 65.

Mitchell was considered one of the world’s leading urban theorists. Through the work of his Smart Cities research group at the MIT Media Lab, he pioneered new approaches to integrating design and technology to make cities more responsive to their citizens and more efficient in their use of resources. He likened tomorrow’s cities to living organisms or very-large-scale robots, with nervous systems that enable them to sense changes in the needs of their inhabitants and external conditions, and respond to these needs.

Bills book City of Bits: Space, Place, and the Infobahn (1995) had a major influence on our work here at digital urban. While not technical per-se it is a book full of ideas looking into a new type of city, and the systems of virtual spaces interconnected by the Internet – or – information superhighway as it was then known. Bill’s follow up e-topia: Urban Life, Jim-But Not As We Know It (1999) was equally influential.

It is a sad day, Bill was one of the greats, he gave a lecture in CASA while in London and it remains one of the best lectures we have had from an external speaker.

A memorial service will be held at MIT at the new Media Lab Complex, 75 Amherst Street, Cambridge, MA, on Wednesday, June 16 at 10 a.m. Our thoughts go to his family and friends.

Author Bio

Andy is Professor of Digital Urban Systems at the Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis at University College London.

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2010 – Back to the Blog

A quick post while we settle in back at our desk after the Christmas break. Its going to be an interesting first quarter here at digital urban and CASA, we have a 1.5 million funded project nearing beta launch which most annoyingly we have been unable to blog about due to legal restrictions. As soon as we get the go ahead we will be putting out a call for testers, all we can say at the moment is that its going to be exciting and perhaps change the way we look at everything around us.

We also have a new mapping tool launching around March as part of the NeISS project, this builds on our previous work involving BBC Radio and TV, again we can’t say too much at the moment but its going to be free and quite neat.

So the first part of 2010 is looking busy on the blog front, indeed this afternoon we hope to put up a post regarding Twitter and Snow Surveys which provides a quick glimpse of what the team are working on behind the scenes.

At the moment the office is a joyful 14.1 centigrade and a mere -1.8 outside which is kind of chilly for London – you can of course view the live weather conditions from our roof in London Town either on a Chumby, iPhone or fullscreen in Flash.

Author Bio

Andy is Professor of Digital Urban Systems at the Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis at University College London.

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A quick post while we settle in back at our desk after the Christmas break. Its going to be an interesting first quarter here at digital urban and CASA, we have a 1.5 million funded project nearing beta launch which most annoyingly we have been unable to blog about due to legal restrictions. As soon as we get the go ahead we will be putting out a call for testers, all we can say at the moment is that its going to be exciting and perhaps change the way we look at everything around us.

We also have a new mapping tool launching around March as part of the NeISS project, this builds on our previous work involving BBC Radio and TV, again we can’t say too much at the moment but its going to be free and quite neat.

So the first part of 2010 is looking busy on the blog front, indeed this afternoon we hope to put up a post regarding Twitter and Snow Surveys which provides a quick glimpse of what the team are working on behind the scenes.

At the moment the office is a joyful 14.1 centigrade and a mere -1.8 outside which is kind of chilly for London – you can of course view the live weather conditions from our roof in London Town either on a Chumby, iPhone or fullscreen in Flash.

Author Bio

Andy is Professor of Digital Urban Systems at the Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis at University College London.

1 Comment

  1. Dan - August 22, 2007

    When you click on the links in your map (in FireFox) the new page loads up inside the GMap I-frame!

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This is now the third post on ‘How to Embed Google MyMaps into a blog’ and finally it has been integrated direct into the Google MyMaps service.

Once you have created your MyMap simply click on the ‘Link to this page’ option and the code is available to cut and paste into a website or blog:
Once your code is inserted your MyMaps will appear directly in a blog post – as illustrated below:


View Larger Map

While this is a quick and easy route our original ‘Embedding MyMaps into Blogger‘ tutorial is still preferable as it uses MyMapsPlus which allows the sidebar and thus the key to the map to be included in the page.

To be honest we are not sure why Google left out the option to include the sidebar – given that it is a integral part of the map?

Author Bio

Andy is Professor of Digital Urban Systems at the Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis at University College London.

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