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SketchUp 7.1 for Architectural Visualization – Three Copies to Give Away! | digital urban

SketchUp 7.1 for Architectural Visualization – Three Copies to Give Away!

Google SketchUp is one of our favorite packages for its shear innovation and ease of use, it arguably brought 3D modelling to the masses. As such tutorial style books are a great way to learn the intiqquses, tips and technnigquws to improve your workflow and get the best out of the software. SkeetchUp 7.1 for Architectural Visualisation by Robin de Jongh is published by PACKT Publishing and is a must buy for anyone
 
With this book in hand and patented technology such as the PhotoMatch, Push-Pull, and Face-me components you can produce commercial quality photo-realistic or artistic output of your designs.

This book shows you how to master SketchUp’s unique tools to create architectural visuals using professional rendering and image editing techniques in a clear and friendly way. You’ll be able to get started immediately using these SketchUp tools and open-source rendering software. The book shows you how to create architectural visuals from your SketchUp models. In no time you’ll be creating photo-realistic renders, animated fly-overs, and walkthroughs. You will also create composites of real and rendered images, creating digital and paper presentations to wow clients. For the impatient, a “Quickstart” tutorial is provided in the first chapter to get you rendering a photo-realistic scene immediately. The rest of the book builds on this knowledge by introducing in-depth concepts, tricks, and methods in an easy-to-follow format through quick tutorials.

Using easy step-by-step explanations, this book opens the door to the world of architectural visualization. With no prior visualization experience you will quickly get to grips with materials, texturing, composition, photo-compositing, lighting setup, rendering, and post-processing. You’ll also be able to take SketchUp’s unique sketchy output and add the artistic touch to create pencil and watercolor scenes. With this book you’ll be able to get started immediately using the free SketchUp download and open-source rendering software.

About the Author

Robin de Jongh

Robin de Jongh has worked as a computer-aided design professional on large and tiny construction projects for many years. He occasionally works as a freelance consulting engineer and has previously run a CAD and visualization company using SketchUp as the main design tool. Robin recently set up a SketchUp training firm through which he promotes SketchUp as the future of CAD in the Architecture, Engineering, and Construction (AEC) sector by providing training seminars and e-learning products.

Author Bio

Andy is Director of the Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis at University College London and Professor of Digital Urban Systems.

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The Future of Augmented Reality (?)

The movie below provides a view on the future of Augmented Reality. We are big fans of augmented reality here at digital urban but someone we dont quite see it as the future. There is something that simply does not feel right within the general day to day urban context:


We maybe wrong but waving your phone around simply does not feel like the future to us, hyper location based services linked to voice recognition system such as the emerging SIRI are perhaps more likely than an augmented reality future, at least in the short term…. (?)

Author Bio

Andy is Director of the Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis at University College London and Professor of Digital Urban Systems.

4 Comments

  1. eAi - October 10, 2011

    I agree, augmented reality often just seems to be ‘cool’ rather than actually good enough to be useful. I’ve never seen a use for it that’s actually better than the alternative more traditional interfaces.

  2. Andy - October 10, 2011

    I just don’t quite see that waving my phone around is a step forward even if it uses image recgonition and AR overlays. AR is a good bang for the buck as its quite easy to develop and has a high wow factor. It just seems a bit lost in the everyday environment above and beyond the odd application such as hertiage.

  3. Jakub Krukar - October 10, 2011

    The way AR is presented here is not only NOT a step forward, it’s a step backward actually. It just adds more complexity to simple processes (such as checking weather or bus timetables) for the sake of coolness. But coolness is always subject to fast inflation. Evantually people will search for things that are more efficient. Why to grab your phone and aim at buses if you can just have a look at the electronic sign next to the bus stop?

    It might end up as a cool gadget for car dealers or something but can’t see a reason why people would use it for the very same information they can get through faster and lighter AR-free iphone apps.

  4. Anonymous - November 4, 2011

    Consider AR applications aside from a smart phone. What about military environments with AR embedded in a helmet that soldiers wear on an every day basis? This is more than a high wow factor, it would reduce casualties in the field.

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