Further to our previous post on Controlling Google Earth ala Minority Report, thanks to the Atlas Gloves from was Dan Phiffer and Mushon Zer-Aviv, we decided to try them out for ourselves.

Using a pair of ping pong balls, that Joel our System Administrator found in a cupboard at home, a couple of led torches from down Tottenham Court Road and a touch of superglue we cobbled together our interpretation of the Atlas Glove controllers. (pictured right).

For our test we utilized a projector displaying Google Earth and the control software in a blacked out lecture theatre. This allowed a clear view of the lights which are turned on and off in combination with various hand gestures to remotely control Google Earth. The movie below demonstrates the trial, we were going to leave the movie audio free but couldn’t resist dubbing in the The Sorcerer’s Apprentice by Stokowski. The controller is Joel who quickly became a master of the technique.

Linking Google Earth to a remote vision based control interface is impressive and the fact it worked first time is testament to the teams clear instructions and software.

Of note to some users experiencing a ‘Grey Screen’ when loading the software, through trial and error we found that you also need to install WinVDIG version 1.1.1 (not the current 1.5 release). This enabled the control software to communicate with the webcam.

Author Bio

Andy is Professor of Digital Urban Systems at the Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis at University College London.

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Google Map Image Creator – Preview

Modelling buildings often demands resolutions higher than medium priced digital cameras can capture. To this end we often use a zoom lens and stitch together a batch of images to create a high resolution facade.

To date there has been no easy way to place these images online for viewing, as such we are pleased to announce the forthcoming GMap Image Cutter by Richard Milton at CASA (home of digital urban). GMap Image Cutter slices up high resolution images and creates a Google Map template in which to view them, a quick and easy solution to sharing or proofing large image files.

Pictured above is the Old Dispensary in Newham, London – use the controls to zoom in and out. Created from over 20 6Mb photographs it captures enough detail to assist the modelling process, GMap Image Cutter has processed the image into 1365 separate files.

Author Bio

Andy is Professor of Digital Urban Systems at the Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis at University College London.

5 Comments

  1. Anonymous - January 17, 2007

    “To date there has been no easy way to place these images online for viewing”

    Have you used Zoomify?

    This program does what Richard is working on, except his uses the Google API and Zoomify uses Flash.

    Regardless, keep up the good work!

  2. Andy - January 17, 2007

    Thanks for the comment, yep ive used Zoomify. I used to use Viewpoints ZoomView a lot which was a great piece of software, sadly no longer available.

    Google’s API is a easy way so share high res images without a plugin and in an interface that people are familiar with.

  3. Greg - January 18, 2007

    Hi Andy, as you know I am a fan of the google maps for large images 🙂

    For some time now I have wanted to use this tiling method to get very high resolution textures into GE. Is this part of what the CASA tools will do?

  4. Santiago Miret - January 25, 2007

    That´s a great way of show a picture. Would you show me how you do it? what program you use?

    Thanks, and sorry for my terrible english.

  5. Chad - January 31, 2007

    Great idea! I am waiting with bated breath to get my hands on this…

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