AAG Final Call: Neogeography

Our session on Neogeography at next years AAG has proved popular, to such an extent that we are looking to split it into two sections. As such we have places left for papers, all we require is an abstract and your pin.

Session titles is ‘Concepts, Tools and Applications: The Rise of Neogeography’, final closing date is

ForDigital Urban in association with Dr Andrew Crooks from GIS Agents are organising a session at the 2009 AAG entitled “Concepts, Tools and Applications: The Rise of Neogeography”. Full details are below along with details on how to submit and abstract – note the closing date is 8th October 2008.

Below is an extended abstract for the session:

The world of Geographic Information (GI) Science has changed. It has experienced expeditious growth over the last few years leading to fundamental changes to the field. Web 2.0, specifically The Cloud, GeoWeb and Crowd Sourcing are revolutionising the way in which we gather, present, share and analyse geographic data. This renaissance in the importance of geography in the Web 2.0 world is becoming known as ‘Neogeography’.

Neogeography is geography for the general public using Web 2.0 techniques to create and overlay their own locational and related information on and into systems that mirror the real world. Location and space now represents a key part of the Web 2.0 revolution. Tagging not only the type of information but where such information is produced, who uses it and at what time, is fast becoming the killer application that roots information about interactivity generated across the web to systems that users can easily access and use in their own communication with others.

The aim of this session is twofold; first to bring together practitioners to discuss concepts and challenges that the field of Neogeography faces. Secondly, to provide an opportunity for researchers and developers to present recent tools and applications for collecting, sharing and communicating spatial data for the Neogeographer. We are actively seeking topics ranging across the entire spectrum of Neogeography, from Crowdsourcing, Digital Earths, Neogeography, Web Mashups, Volunteered Geographic Information, Virtual Worlds (e.g. Second Life) and associated Web 2.0 technologies.

Anyone who wishes to presents a paper must first register for the annual meeting, submit an abstract (no more than 250 words that describes the presentation’s purpose, methods, and conclusions). Once this has been done, you need to contact us with your program identification number (PIN), which we will use to add you to the session.

We look forward to hearing from you

Andy and Andrew

Further details on the paper requirements and cost of registration for the AAG meeting can be found at http://www.aag.org/annualmeetings/2009/index.htm

Author Bio

Andy is Professor of Digital Urban Systems at the Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis at University College London.

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Imagining the Recursive City: Explorations in Urban Simulacra

IMAGINING THE RECURSIVE CITY: EXPLORATIONS IN URBAN SIMULACRA by Prof Mike Batty and Dr Andrew Hudson-Smith

Cities are microcosms of societies, worlds within worlds, which repeat themselves at different spatial scales and over different time horizons. In this essay, we argue that such recursion is taken to an entirely new level in the digital age where we can represent cities numerically, embed them within computers, scale and distort their representations so that we can embed them within one another, even believing them to be ‘computers’ in their own right.

We begin with the conundrum of recursion, showing how its occurrence in cities through spatial similarity at different scales, leads to worlds within worlds. We illustrate these ideas with a large-scale digital representation of the core of a world city,London, showing how we can generate different realizations of the city for different purposes. We embed these representations within one another, building virtual worlds, moving from the material to the digital and back again, using the digital model to represent the material world in different ways, and finally printing – fabricating the model.

Our message is that digital representation opens a cornucopia of possibilities in representation and communication through a variety of devices which in turn can be embedded in the city, Escher-like, and which indeed are rapidly becoming the city.

You can download the paper here (1047Kb).

Author Bio

Andy is Professor of Digital Urban Systems at the Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis at University College London.

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