Physical Space Tweets: Pst! microCONTROL

Pst! is the surreptitious beckoning of attention and the acronym for Physical Space Tweets. It is a small Ardunio storyteller installed in public space giving an audience a glimpse into a geo-tagged community’s topic feed.

For the Leeds Pavillion at Mediamatic’s Amsterdam Biennale 2009 Pst! chronicled life in Leeds through it’s twitter feed.

Pst! microCONTROL from Megan Leigh Smith on Vimeo.

The piece locates a public social narrative by pulling an information feed from Twitter User profiles geographically aligned to Leeds with Twitter’s geocode API and then prints this information onto a mini LCD screen. By removing the peripheral of the computer a Pst! device can be placed in a non-space providing a window directly into a geo-located public space.

See http://megansmith.ca/blog/?tag=arduino for more info.

Author Bio

Andy is Professor of Digital Urban Systems at the Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis at University College London.

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Author Bio

Andy is Professor of Digital Urban Systems at the Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis at University College London.

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Crowd Sourced 3D Modelling?

At the Intel Developer Forum in San Francisco, Intel CEO Paul Otellini demoed how the company’s processors are being used to render a 3D model from millions of user-generated images taken from photo-sharing sites such as Flicker and Picasa. We like the view that this could lead to crowd sourced 3D modelling, indeed it seems to be the current trend:
The work is being done at the University of Washington, where researchers have crowd-sourced images from the Web and created 3D re-construction of St. Peter’s Basilica in Vatican City.

Author Bio

Andy is Professor of Digital Urban Systems at the Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis at University College London.

2 Comments

  1. NomadOfNorad - October 11, 2011

    Interesting. Is it possible to extract the resulting 3D object and import it into, say, Poser? Or create from it a Collada file and import that into Second Life?

  2. Victor Ferreira - October 11, 2011

    The main focus of most efforts like the one portraied seem to be Internet images, maybe because of the untapped resource it is, for the sheer volume of images available. But you can do it with your one images also, as we have been doing it in my research group here in Portugal: http://archc3d.fa.utl.pt/archc3d.html We already did 3d models of a world heritage castle/convent and a historic city centre (Tomar), with photos taken with a balloon and a RC airplane!

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At the Intel Developer Forum in San Francisco, Intel CEO Paul Otellini demoed how the company’s processors are being used to render a 3D model from millions of user-generated images taken from photo-sharing sites such as Flicker and Picasa. We like the view that this could lead to crowd sourced 3D modelling, indeed it seems to be the current trend:
The work is being done at the University of Washington, where researchers have crowd-sourced images from the Web and created 3D re-construction of St. Peter’s Basilica in Vatican City.

Author Bio

Andy is Professor of Digital Urban Systems at the Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis at University College London.

1 Comment

  1. Gerardo64 - February 20, 2009

    Funny. Night ligths in the day zone?..
    I´ve made an overlay for GE time ago that shows the things correct. The file is not working rigth know due to some problems the Google Earth Community server has had. But here you have an image of what I´m saying:
    http://img137.imageshack.us/img137/7325/earthdaynightoverlayej7.jpg

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Google Earth 5 is impressive – its allows movies to be made in minutes that before would of taken a couple of days in a high end 3d package. The movie below was captured in real-time using the Sun Cycle combined with NASA’s night time imagery.

The addition of day time imagery to the clip would be a simple case of re-recording using a fixed flightpath and superimposing with the standard earth view. However, we really like the lighting effects of the night cycle combined with the city lights thus the rough cut below:


Google Earth NASA Night from digitalurban on Vimeo.

As a contrast our movie of population density in the UK, below, was visualized in After Effects and took around 3 hours to complete. If we had imported it into Google Earth we could of gained a similar effect in a few minutes.


Visualising Data: UK Population One Light per 200 People from digitalurban on Vimeo.

Music is by a rather good unsigned band – Lemonade Joe.

Author Bio

Andy is Professor of Digital Urban Systems at the Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis at University College London.

3 Comments

  1. Goulding - July 19, 2008

    I think the top image works well. Its conceptually very simple and graphically strong.

    I personally don’t like the pin on the upper side of the image against the black. But that’s all I’d change if it were me…

  2. aydin can polatkan - July 19, 2008

    I think both are good.

    There may be only one improvement to be done, the pin line colour which overlaps with the space can be changed negative.

    That may make it more recognizable, here it seems as a free red dot in the space.

  3. Rich Treves - July 21, 2008

    How about with massive pins that are each bigger than the planet? Would be interesting to see. But I like your original (top).

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