Physical Space Tweets: Pst! microCONTROL

Pst! is the surreptitious beckoning of attention and the acronym for Physical Space Tweets. It is a small Ardunio storyteller installed in public space giving an audience a glimpse into a geo-tagged community’s topic feed.

For the Leeds Pavillion at Mediamatic’s Amsterdam Biennale 2009 Pst! chronicled life in Leeds through it’s twitter feed.

Pst! microCONTROL from Megan Leigh Smith on Vimeo.

The piece locates a public social narrative by pulling an information feed from Twitter User profiles geographically aligned to Leeds with Twitter’s geocode API and then prints this information onto a mini LCD screen. By removing the peripheral of the computer a Pst! device can be placed in a non-space providing a window directly into a geo-located public space.

See http://megansmith.ca/blog/?tag=arduino for more info.

Author Bio

Andy is Professor of Digital Urban Systems at the Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis at University College London.

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The Chapel HDR Timelapse and ‘Making Of’

Regular readers will know that we have a bit of a ‘thing’ for the interiors of churches/chapels, timelapse imagery and high dynamic range photography, as such the movie below is one of our favourites:

The Chapel is a short film by lookycreative.com paying tribute to an exceptional protestant temple in Zeliszów, Poland, designed by Karl Langhans and built in 1796-1797. The variety of techniques behind the movie is notable, and thankfully the makers have made a ‘Making of’ movie, below:

The tutorials mentioned in the clip can be found at: lookycreative.com/timelapse-compendium

Inspiring work….

Author Bio

Andy is Professor of Digital Urban Systems at the Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis at University College London.

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Digital City Installation – The Circus by Collectif

An art/archtiecture/city based installation by a group of swiss contemporary artists C.Piguet, A.Schneider and S.Thommen who go under the name of collectif caught our eye this morning.

The piece known as ‘Circus’ deals in a very unusual way the construction of space. The video work is based on digital photos of a busy square in Geneva that the artistsdissembled into layers and subjected to digital animation.

In the words of collectif – the installation shows a constantly moving view of the city that seems to be disintegrating. Set pieces of urban architecture, logos and passers-by float incalculably and vertiginously towards the viewers.

On the basis of the photographic document of a real city, the artists create a three dimensionality that refers indirectly to the virtual 3D worlds of computer games, while at the same time deconstructing the unambiguity and coherence of their spatial order and hyperrealistic graphics.

In addition, the work refers to the way in which we appropriate urban structures. The accelerated movement and navigation in the public space, results in the non-linear perception of our environment, the associative scanning of distinctive points of reference and landmarks and striking details.

The movie below is particularly interesting with regards its composition and use of layers:

Accordingly, the customary conception of the city as a homogeneous, clearly structured unified whole, the basis of two-dimensional postcard vistas and the cartographic urban model, gives way to a fragmentary, fleeting, dynamic picture of urban space.

For more details and other installations see the collectif website.

Author Bio

Andy is Professor of Digital Urban Systems at the Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis at University College London.

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An art/archtiecture/city based installation by a group of swiss contemporary artists C.Piguet, A.Schneider and S.Thommen who go under the name of collectif caught our eye this morning.

The piece known as ‘Circus’ deals in a very unusual way the construction of space. The video work is based on digital photos of a busy square in Geneva that the artistsdissembled into layers and subjected to digital animation.

In the words of collectif – the installation shows a constantly moving view of the city that seems to be disintegrating. Set pieces of urban architecture, logos and passers-by float incalculably and vertiginously towards the viewers.

On the basis of the photographic document of a real city, the artists create a three dimensionality that refers indirectly to the virtual 3D worlds of computer games, while at the same time deconstructing the unambiguity and coherence of their spatial order and hyperrealistic graphics.

In addition, the work refers to the way in which we appropriate urban structures. The accelerated movement and navigation in the public space, results in the non-linear perception of our environment, the associative scanning of distinctive points of reference and landmarks and striking details.

The movie below is particularly interesting with regards its composition and use of layers:

Accordingly, the customary conception of the city as a homogeneous, clearly structured unified whole, the basis of two-dimensional postcard vistas and the cartographic urban model, gives way to a fragmentary, fleeting, dynamic picture of urban space.

For more details and other installations see the collectif website.

Author Bio

Andy is Professor of Digital Urban Systems at the Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis at University College London.

Leave a Reply

The Tales of Things project is located within the emerging technical and cultural phenomenon known as ‘The Internet of Things’. The term is attributed to the Auto-ID research group at MIT in 1999, and was explored in depth by the International Telecommunication Union who published a report bearing the same name at the United Nations net summit in 2005. The term, ‘Internet of things’, refers to the technical and cultural shift that is anticipated as society moves towards a ubiquitous form of computing in which every device is ‘on’, and every device is connected in some way to the Internet.
TalesofThings.com allows any object to be given its own webpage and ability to tweet, i.e. it allows any ‘thing’ to become connected. As such we have built an ‘Arduino Thing’ that welcomes all new objects joining the Internet of Things with a ‘Hi’ in Morse Code – the movie below reveals all:
Every time anyone adds an object to talesofthings our unit starts its morse code welcome, in a small way its a step towards things talking to things. Sure its not Skynet, an artificially intelligent system which became self-aware and revolted against its creators but we are working on our own protocols behind the scenes to take this further so all the objects are aware of the other objects.

Thanks go to Martin de Jode of the TOTeM team – via the TOTeM Blog.

Head over to TalesofThings.com to add your own object.

Author Bio

Andy is Professor of Digital Urban Systems at the Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis at University College London.

6 Comments

  1. Anonymous - June 3, 2007

    *shrug*. I tried several times to install the Virtual Earth plugin in Firefox and IE, no luck. Wake me up when they have a working product.

  2. Anonymous - June 18, 2007

    Really, really cool. A number of other major cities were also added with this update as well. Anyways, if you want to view New York, I recommend you have a very powerful PC (if it can run Vista well and is running XP, you’re all set) and that you set the cache to 30GB (30720 in the Options>3D Settings window), 20GB minimum so that you aren’t waiting forever and a day for the buildings to load.

  3. Anonymous - June 19, 2007

    Actually, try 50GB with textures and 40GB without, find that works much better.

  4. ehanson - August 7, 2007

    Great video. I’m wondering if the released data can be used in Google Earth.

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  6. Web Designer - January 13, 2009

    I installed Google Earth and it amazes me how I can visit all the cities I have lived in and see the changes taking place without being there. Technology is surely changing fast.

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