SketchUp 7.1 for Architectural Visualization – Three Copies to Give Away!

Google SketchUp is one of our favorite packages for its shear innovation and ease of use, it arguably brought 3D modelling to the masses. As such tutorial style books are a great way to learn the intiqquses, tips and technnigquws to improve your workflow and get the best out of the software. SkeetchUp 7.1 for Architectural Visualisation by Robin de Jongh is published by PACKT Publishing and is a must buy for anyone
 
With this book in hand and patented technology such as the PhotoMatch, Push-Pull, and Face-me components you can produce commercial quality photo-realistic or artistic output of your designs.

This book shows you how to master SketchUp’s unique tools to create architectural visuals using professional rendering and image editing techniques in a clear and friendly way. You’ll be able to get started immediately using these SketchUp tools and open-source rendering software. The book shows you how to create architectural visuals from your SketchUp models. In no time you’ll be creating photo-realistic renders, animated fly-overs, and walkthroughs. You will also create composites of real and rendered images, creating digital and paper presentations to wow clients. For the impatient, a “Quickstart” tutorial is provided in the first chapter to get you rendering a photo-realistic scene immediately. The rest of the book builds on this knowledge by introducing in-depth concepts, tricks, and methods in an easy-to-follow format through quick tutorials.

Using easy step-by-step explanations, this book opens the door to the world of architectural visualization. With no prior visualization experience you will quickly get to grips with materials, texturing, composition, photo-compositing, lighting setup, rendering, and post-processing. You’ll also be able to take SketchUp’s unique sketchy output and add the artistic touch to create pencil and watercolor scenes. With this book you’ll be able to get started immediately using the free SketchUp download and open-source rendering software.

About the Author

Robin de Jongh

Robin de Jongh has worked as a computer-aided design professional on large and tiny construction projects for many years. He occasionally works as a freelance consulting engineer and has previously run a CAD and visualization company using SketchUp as the main design tool. Robin recently set up a SketchUp training firm through which he promotes SketchUp as the future of CAD in the Architecture, Engineering, and Construction (AEC) sector by providing training seminars and e-learning products.

Author Bio

Andy is Professor of Digital Urban Systems at the Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis at University College London.

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Trail Rending of Agents with NavMesh, Physics, Unity and CityEngine

Combining simple agent based models with physics objects and rendering techniques in a game engine has potential for city wide 3D urban modelling. Traditional techniques often use JAVA based solutions or custom written toolkits with researchers developing their own models. With recent advances in procedural modelling and game engine technology, with the move to real time data feeds and advanced physics engines, there is notable potential.

Trail Render in Unity

Trail Render in Unity

Yesterday’s post on ‘Shortest Path Modelling and NavMesh in Unity and CityEngine‘ explored a simple target/navmesh approach. If you add physics to the target and use the ‘trail rendering’ effects of Unity you can create a dynamic scene with the paths of the agents traced. It is of course exploratory, but the possibilities are intriguing:

The Trail Renderer is simply used to make trails behind objects in the scene as they move about – with the addition of physics the ball reacts to the mesh and the agents are continuously calculating a shortest path. This is computationally intensive so a question remains on the number of agents Unity can handle in a single simulation, we will be exploring this over the coming weeks.

Author Bio

Andy is Professor of Digital Urban Systems at the Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis at University College London.

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