In out series of tweetography maps the latest addition is the Moscow New City Landscape. And it is now also available as an interactive, zoom and pan-able map using the GMap Image Cutter.
Russia, but mainly Moscow are currently going through an internet boom and in this context twitter has become quite popular. The data we were able to collect using the Steven Grays code of the Tweet-O-Meter was slightly less compared to the very active cities of London and New York. The percentage of geolocated tweets is with almost 12% however higher than those tweet intensive cities.

Moscow New City Landscape

Image by urbanTick using the GMap Image Cutter / Moscow New City Landscape -Use the Google Maps style zoom function in the top right corner to zoom into the map and explore it in detail. Explore areas you know close up and find new locations you have never heard of. Click HERE for a full screen view.

The character of the final map i in comparison to London or also Paris more distributed and includes a number of hot spots. The city seems to be active in a few place simultaneously. This island characteristic however still has a major location centered on around the area of the Kremlin, with the main peak just above the Lenin Library Mettro station. The lines of dispersion sort of indicate te metro lines and follow roughly the stations from the centre to the outskirts. One strong ‘arm’ is going from the centre toward the olympic stadium in the North-East.
There is also a tendency of quite a lot of activity along the main road from Moscow to St. Petersburg, centre towards North-West. The North -West quarter is generally a bit more active than the three others with the South-East being the lowest. This fits roughly with the wealth distribution in Moscow with the South-East being a production area.
Regarding the parks and open spaces, same pattern a previously, no twitter activity. However in this case this is little surprising since parks are very unpopular in Moscow with perceiving them as low safety areas.

This map was produced in the context of the recent workshop at Strelkainstitute. Thanks for the cyrillic translation to Masha. The maps were created using our Tweet-O-Meter, in association with DigitalUrban and coded by Steven Gray, this New City Landscape represents location based twitter activity.

Author Bio

Andy is Professor of Digital Urban Systems at the Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis at University College London.

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Visualising the Globe – Digital Earth and Virtual Cities

A lecture this week at the Royal Institution with Professor Mike Batty, on visualising the Global Environment and Virtual London required a number of movies to be produced with data overlayed on both a global and local scale.

We needed the ability to visualise data relating to global temperature change, hurricanes, heatwaves, etc mapped onto the earth as well as being able to fly into high resolution local imagery of London. Initially we used ArcGlobe, part of ArcGIS 9, unfortunately it did not prove to be the ideal tool due a complicated animation system, frequent crashing and the inability to simply paste initially non-geographically referenced data onto the globe.

In light of this we moved our focus onto Google’s Keyhole Pro. A quick email to the offices and we had a full license allowing us to paste in images, shape files and render movies. Keyhole provided us with the ability to quickly add in our own data and tap into other users data shared over the web.

In the space of a few hours we had a number of movies covering both the earth as a whole and tours of London, allowing us to make the point that data collection and indeed manipulation is now opening up to users outside of the GIS community.

A movie demonstrating a flying into London as well as overlays relating to climatic conditions can be viewed from here (19Mb). The movie is encoded in DIVX format, which you can find out more about and download the encoder if required from our main movie page.

Author Bio

Andy is Professor of Digital Urban Systems at the Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis at University College London.

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